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bostonreview:

Pardon the Interruption, We Are Changing the Country — a report from the streets of Sao Paolo
Having lived in the United States for almost thirty years, I am always amazed that Americans persist in believing that this is a land of unparalleled opportunity and social mobility. A bit suspect to begin with, the Horatio Alger story has been transformed, over the decades, into a chronic mental block. To well-educated youngsters from affluent backgrounds who know how to work the system, and even to well-educated immigrants such as myself, this is indeed a land of great opportunity. But for all too many working-class Americans—and a lot of them aren’t members of minority groups—U.S. society is less of a launchpad than a glue trap. With their feet stuck to the ground, they have little prospect of ascending very far.
John Cassidy, at the New Yorker (via thesmithian)
The words the happy say
Are paltry melody
But those the silent feel
Are beautiful—
Emily Dickinson, “1750” (via)

purplesmauge:

crowleysdelicateass:

popsible:

I love this new trend of actresses calling reporters out on their bullshit.

Can I just, Renner’s face is the second and third frames. He’s so disappointed in the male race at that moment. And so proud of Scarlett.

Scarlett Johansen, you are badass.

At the moment, probably the most pressing need is simply to slow down the engines of productivity. This might seem a strange thing to say—our knee-jerk reaction to every crisis is to assume the solution is for everyone to work even more, though of course, this kind of reaction is really precisely the problem—but if you consider the overall state of the world, the conclusion becomes obvious. We seem to be facing two insoluble problems. On the one hand, we have witnessed an endless series of global debt crises, which have grown only more and more severe since the seventies, to the point where the overall burden of debt—sovereign, municipal, corporate, personal—is obviously unsustainable. On the other, we have an ecological crisis, a galloping process of climate change that is threatening to throw the entire planet into drought, floods, chaos, starvation, and war. The two might seem unrelated. But ultimately they are the same. What is debt, after all, but the promise of future productivity? Saying that global debt levels keep rising is simply another way of saying that, as a collectivity, human beings are promising each other to produce an even greater volume of goods and services in the future than they are creating now. But even current levels are clearly unsustainable. They are precisely what’s destroying the planet, at an ever-increasing pace.
The Grey Lady

bostonreview:

New York Times headlines on Glenn Greenwald’s big scoop for the Guardian (you know, a newspaper):

First: “Anti-Surveillance Activist Is at Center of New Leak”

Then: “Blogger, With Focus on Surveillance, Is at Center of a Debate”

Even the Times’s Public Editor Margaret Sullivan thought the newspaper was being dismissive.


Time to euthanize the grey lady.

reuters:

Ahead of the G8 meeting, fake shops are hiding the real economic troubles of Northern Ireland.
At a former butcher’s shop, stickers applied to the windows show a packed meat counter and give the impression that business is booming. Across the street, another empty unit has been given a makeover to look like a thriving office supply shop. 
Locals are unimpressed.
Local councils in Northern Ireland have painted fake shop fronts to hide the economic hardship being felt in towns and villages near the golf resort where G8 leaders will meet this month.
Northern Ireland’s government has spent 2 million pounds tackling dereliction over the past two years. Almost a quarter of these funds were freed up in anticipation of Britain hosting the annual Group of Eight (G8) summit on June 17-18. 
A dog stretches during his walk in front of a fake shop in Belcoo, Ireland on June 3, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughtonView our top photos from the past 24 hours.

reuters:

Ahead of the G8 meeting, fake shops are hiding the real economic troubles of Northern Ireland.

At a former butcher’s shop, stickers applied to the windows show a packed meat counter and give the impression that business is booming. Across the street, another empty unit has been given a makeover to look like a thriving office supply shop.

Locals are unimpressed.

Local councils in Northern Ireland have painted fake shop fronts to hide the economic hardship being felt in towns and villages near the golf resort where G8 leaders will meet this month.

Northern Ireland’s government has spent 2 million pounds tackling dereliction over the past two years. Almost a quarter of these funds were freed up in anticipation of Britain hosting the annual Group of Eight (G8) summit on June 17-18. 

A dog stretches during his walk in front of a fake shop in Belcoo, Ireland on June 3, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

View our top photos from the past 24 hours.

reuters:

Reporters worldwide are grappling with government censorship and limits to reporting. Some are even accused and convicted of activities against governments that are landing them in jail.
In the past week alone, the following reports have been made:
An Egyptian blogger has been convicted of insulting the president.
In China, most mentions of the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre were censored from the Internet.
Turkish protesters accused media of ignoring unrest; reports of anti-press attacks amid Turkey protests raise questions of censorship.
Congo Republic suspended four independent newspapers
Burundi enacted media law that reporters say curbs press freedoms.
Guinea media set strike after government shuts opposition radio.
The Palestinian Authority arrested the general manager of a Bethlehem radio station.
Ethiopia arrested a reporter after he covered the story of evictions in dam region.
Toronto Star reporter was arrested and ticketed after taking photos of injured public transit employee. 
Imprisonment of journalists worldwide reached a record high in 2012, driven in part by the use of charges of terrorism and anti-state offenses against reporters and editors, reported the Committee to Protect Journalists in its annual census of imprisoned journalists.
CPJ video summary of the 2012 report on media imprisonment: 


Photo: Activists wearing masks of jailed Nobel laureate, writer, professor and activist Liu Xiaobo hold candles during a night vigil at Liberty Square in Taipei June 4, 2013, on the 24th anniversary of the June 4 crackdown on pro-democracy protesters at Tiananmen Square in Beijing. REUTERS/Steven Chen

reuters:

Reporters worldwide are grappling with government censorship and limits to reporting. Some are even accused and convicted of activities against governments that are landing them in jail.

In the past week alone, the following reports have been made:

An Egyptian blogger has been convicted of insulting the president.

In China, most mentions of the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre were censored from the Internet.

Turkish protesters accused media of ignoring unrestreports of anti-press attacks amid Turkey protests raise questions of censorship.

Congo Republic suspended four independent newspapers

Burundi enacted media law that reporters say curbs press freedoms.

Guinea media set strike after government shuts opposition radio.

The Palestinian Authority arrested the general manager of a Bethlehem radio station.

Ethiopia arrested a reporter after he covered the story of evictions in dam region.

Toronto Star reporter was arrested and ticketed after taking photos of injured public transit employee. 

Imprisonment of journalists worldwide reached a record high in 2012, driven in part by the use of charges of terrorism and anti-state offenses against reporters and editors, reported the Committee to Protect Journalists in its annual census of imprisoned journalists.

CPJ video summary of the 2012 report on media imprisonment: 

Photo: Activists wearing masks of jailed Nobel laureate, writer, professor and activist Liu Xiaobo hold candles during a night vigil at Liberty Square in Taipei June 4, 2013, on the 24th anniversary of the June 4 crackdown on pro-democracy protesters at Tiananmen Square in Beijing. REUTERS/Steven Chen

"I can well say that I did not begin to live until I looked on myself as a dead man."—Jean-Jacques Rousseau